Past Events

The One Health @ UGA Seminar Series & Symposia highlight efforts at UGA and across the Southeast that are focused on interdisciplinary teaching and learning, research, and outreach at the nexus of human, animal and ecological health.  It is supported by the BHSI Division of One Health.

Past Seminars & Symposia

2017 Seminars
Antibiotic Resistance Collaborative Meeting

March 22, 2017
Veterinary Educational Center
University of Georgia, Athens, GA

This workshop was the first of several to brainstorm collaborative projects with a One Health perspective. One Health@UGA and the Emory Antimicrobial Resistance Center invited participants to abandon their silos and share ideas and expertise to make progress on this front. Attendees explored novel ways to overcome antibiotic resistance from molecular biology to health practice and public education.

One Health Antimicrobial Resistance Invite_March 22
2016 Seminars
Antibiotic failure mediated by a phenotypically resistant bacterial subpopulation

Elizabeth Howerth, DVM, PhD, DACVP
November 9, 2016
George Hall, Health Sciences Campus
University of Georgia, Athens, GA

This presentation detailed a recent case of canine M.bovis infection and led discussions related to potential transmission during veterinary procedures, necropsy, and potential transmission to owners of certain types of infections. Dr. Chris Whalen, Director of the Center of Global Health also joined the conversation.

Video of Presentation

UGA One Health_Community Presentation_Nov 9, 2016
Antibiotic failure mediated by a phenotypically resistant bacterial subpopulation

David Weiss, PhD
April 13, 2016
Coverdell Center, Room 175
University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Dr. Weiss received his Ph.D. degree in Microbiology from New York University in 2004. Working under Dr. Arturo Zychlinsky, he studied how Toll-like Receptors work together to fight bacterial infections. He completed his postdoctoral training at Stanford University under Drs. Stanley Falkow and Denise Monack, studying virulence mechanisms of Francisella and the role of the inflammasome in host defense. He was the recipient of a three year postdoctoral fellowship from the Giannini Family Foundation. Starting an independent lab at Emory in 2008, Dr. Weiss continued studying Francisella pathogenesis, which led to discoveries of how biotin metabolism contributes to escape from the host phagosome, how lipid A modifications impact virulence, and the role of CRISPR-Cas systems in gene regulation. Dr. Weiss is currently part of the Emory Antibiotic Resistance Center at the Emory School of Medicine and Emory Vaccine Center.

weiss jpeg
The human-animal interface: considerations for high-consequence hemorrhagic fever viruses

Jessica Spengler, DVM, PhD, MPH
Feb 17, 2016
Coverdell Center, Room 175
University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Dr. Spengler received her M.P.H. in infectious diseases in 2004 from the University of California, Berkeley. She completed a California Epidemiologic Investigation Service (Cal-EIS) fellowship with the Vector Borne Disease Section of the California Department of Health from 2004–2005, conducting a statewide field-based epidemiologic investigation on hantavirus and the occupational risk associated with it for forest service employees. She received her Ph.D. (2011) and D.V.M. (2012) from the University of California, Davis. Her graduate research on the pathogenesis and innate immune response to hantaviruses, was performed on-site with the Special Pathogens program of the National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, and the NIH Laboratory of Virology, Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, MT. Since 2012, Dr. Spengler has been with the Viral Special Pathogens Branch at CDC as a research fellow, conducting molecular virology and in vivo studies on several high-containment hemorrhagic fevers viruses, including Ebola virus, Marburg virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, and Rift Valley fever virus. In addition, she assisted in the international public health response to the ongoing Ebola outbreak by serving in the Emergency Operations Center as a Subject Matter Expert for the Laboratory Task Force and the Animal-Human Interface Team. Her research interests include the immune response, pathogenesis, transmission, and species barriers of viral hemorrhagic fevers.

2015 Seminars
Bariatric surgeries induce brain plasticity

Krzysztof Czaja, PhD
November 18, 2015
Coverdell Center, Room 175
University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Reception to follow

Krzysztof Czaja is an associate professor of veterinary biosciences and diagnostic imaging at UGA. He received his D.V.M. in 1993 from the Veterinary Medicine College, Academy of Agriculture and Technology, Olsztyn, Poland. He received his Ph.D. in Neuroanatomy from the University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland in 1997. From 1997-2007 he did postdoctoral work at the University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland; the Institute for Plastination, Heidelberg, Germany and United States Department of Agriculture, Animal Physiology Research Unit, Athens, GA. In 2007, he was appointed to the faculty as an Assistant Professor at Washington State University, Pullman, WA. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 2014. In 2015, Dr. Czaja joined the Veterinary Biosciences & Diagnostic Imaging Department at University of Georgia in Athens. Dr. Czaja is an author of 50+ peer-reviewed publications and has been invited to give numerous presentations and symposia.

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Sustainable Food System Initiative: Feeding the world without eating the world

Liz Kramer, PhD
October 14, 2015
Coverdell Center, Room 175
University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Liz Kramer is the founding director of UGA’s Natural Resources Spatial Analysis (NARSAL) Laboratory in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and is a public service faculty member in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics. Her research involves understanding temporal and spatial dynamics of landscapes in providing an array of ecosystem services. She has a diverse portfolio of interdisciplinary research activities, which include projects in agricultural, urban, and natural systems in areas such as stormwater management, coastal resiliency to climate change, wetland mitigation and restoration, biodiversity management, and enhancing the role of beneficial insects in agricultural systems. Kramer also leads the Sustainable Food Systems Initiative, an interdisciplinary group of faculty researching sustainable agriculture and food system policies. She holds a BS in Forest Management from Michigan State University, a Master in Forest Science from Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and a PhD in Ecology from University of Georgia.

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Drowning in Data yet Unable to Find What You Need? Data Challenges for the 21 Century Health Researcher

Jessica C. Kissinger, PhD
April 15, 2015
Paul D. Coverdell Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences, Room 175
University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Dr. Kissinger is the joint-Director of the Eukaryotic Pathogen Database (EuPathDB.org) and Co- PI of the Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center (MaHPIC). She has been building database repositories for the sharing and mining of data related to Human and veterinary pathogens for 15 years. She combines studies of Human-computer interactions with real-world researcher needs to help design solutions that are both intuitive and useful to those working on the front line with pathogens and their hosts.

Image of spring seminar flyer
Extracellular Vesicle-Mediated Cellular Communication: Its role in virulence propagation and pathology of African Trypansomes

Stephen Hajduk, PhD
Tony Szempruch
March 18, 2015
Paul D. Coverdell Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences, Room 175
University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Dr. Hajduk received his B.S. from the University of Georgia and his Ph.D. from the University of Glasgow, UK. He was a NATO and EMBO visiting scholar at the University of Amsterdam and a Rockefeller Foundation postdoctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins University. He was on the faculty in the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Genetics at the University of Alabama at Birmingham from 1983-2002 and at the Marine Biological Laboratory as a Senior Scientist and founding Director of the Global Infectious Disease Program and Professor of Molecular Microbiology & Immunology at Brown University (2002-06). Appointed Professor and Head of the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology at University of Georgia in 2006 he is a Fogarty International Scholar, a Burroughs Wellcome Scholar in Molecular Parasitology and a Fellow of the American Society for Microbiology.

Dr. Hajduk’s laboratory studies the molecular and biochemical basis of parasitic diseases. His lab is currently investigating several basic molecular pathways in African trypanosomes. These include RNA editing, mitochondrial biogenesis, developmental control of gene expression and mechanisms of cell communication. In addition, his lab is studying human innate immunity to trypanosomes and the mechanisms used by the parasites to infect humans

Tony Szempruch completed his undergraduate degree in microbiology at North Carolina State University. He joined the department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at UGA in 2010 to work with Dr. Stephen Hajduk on mitochondrial RNA editing and molecular mechanisms of protein diversity in Trypanosoma brucei. His research on these processes has resulted in the identification of a novel mechanism for cellular communication and host cell remodeling used by T. brucei.

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Safe Foods Through One Health

Michael Doyle, PhD
January 14, 2015
Paul D. Coverdell Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences, Room 175
University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Dr. Doyle is an active researcher in the area of food safety and security, and he works closely with the food industry, government agencies, and consumer groups on issues related to the microbiological safety of foods.

He has published more than 500 scientific papers on food microbiology and food safety topics and has given more than 800 invited presentations at national and international scientific meetings. He serves on food safety committees of many scientific organizations and has served as a scientific advisor to many groups, including the World Health Organization, the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Science-National Research Council, the International Life Sciences Institute-North America, the Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He has received several awards for his research accomplishments, including the Nicholas Appert Award of the Institute of Food Technologists. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Institute of Food Technologists, the International Association for Food Protection, the National Academy of Inventors, and is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.

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2014 International Symposium

The University of Liverpool and the University of Georgia co-sponsored the second annual One Health International Symposium in Liverpool, England, June 19-21, 2014. Symposium themes: food-borne zoonotic diseases and food safety; emerging infections in companion animals; and the economic and societal effects of these issues. Participants engaged international delegates from industry and government in a comprehensive One Health approach.

 

Symposium Speakers:


Matthew Baylis – University of Liverpool
Mike Begon – University of Liverpool
Malcolm Bennett – University of Liverpool
Darin Carroll – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Peter Clegg – University of Liverpool
Eric Fèvre – University of Liverpool
Ian Greer – University of Liverpool
Jason Halford – University of Liverpool
Silvia Moreno – University of Georgia

Dilys Morgan – Public Health England
Sarah O’Brien – University of Liverpool
Stuart Reid – University of London
Jonathan Rushton – University of Liverpool
Susan Sanchez – University of Georgia
Mary Alice Smith – University of Georgia
Tom Solomon – University of Liverpool – Hear radio interview with Tom Solomon.
Nicola Williams – University of Liverpool
Abigail Wood – Kings College, London

2014 Symposium

The Secret Life of Malaria: A global journey to cure and prevention

Wednesday, March 19, 2014 | 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Paul D. Coverdell Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences, Room 175
University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Join us at the University of Georgia for a symposium addressing diagnostics, therapeutics and prevention of malaria – a disease affecting an estimated 200 million people worldwide annually. The impacts of malaria go beyond the individual, imposing an incredible social and economic burden around the world.

 


Click the talk title for video of each presentation:

Malaria, the Deadly Ambusher: A Personal Perspective
 – Owino Simon Odera, Ph.D. Department of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia

Molecular Surveillance for Tracking Drug Resistance and Novel Diagnostic Tools
 – Venkatachalam Udhayakumar, Ph.D. National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases / Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria/Malaria Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center: The Importance of Systems Biology in the Fight Against Malaria
– Mary Galinski, Ph.D. Infectious Diseases and Global Health, Emory University; Program Director, Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center (MaHPIC)

Mathematical Models of Malaria: From Genes to Environment
 – Juan B. Gutierrez, Ph.D. Department of Mathematics, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, University of Georgia

Is the Landscape Shifting? Closing Remarks from a Veteran in the War Against Malaria
 – Patrick Kachur, MD, MPH, FACPM Chief of the Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Malaria Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

flyer

9:00 – 9:30
Sign In / Meet and Greet

9:30 – 9:45
Welcome
Duncan C. Krause, Ph.D. Faculty of Infectious Diseases, Franklin College, University of Georgia

9:45 – 10:15
Not Just a Disease of Humans
Jessica C. Kissinger, Ph.D. Department of Genetics, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, University of Georgia; Co-principal Investigator, Malaria Host Pathogen Interaction Center (MaHPIC)

10:15 – 10:45
Arthropods as Disease Vectors: Not Just Flying Syringes
Donald E. Champagne, Ph.D. Department of Entomology, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Georgia

10:45 – 11:00
Break

11:00 – 11:30
Extreme Home Makeover: Plasmodium falciparum within the Human Red Blood Cell
Vasant Muralidharan, Ph.D. Department of Cellular Biology, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, University of Georgia

11:30 – 12:00
The More Things Change, The More They Stay The Same: Challenges for Malaria Vaccine Development
David S. Peterson, Ph.D. Department of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia

12:00 – 12:30
What You Don’t Know WILL Kill You: Pathogenesis of Malaria
Julie M. Moore, Ph.D. Department of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia

12:30 – 1:30
Lunch

1:30 – 1:45
Malaria, the Deadly Ambusher: A Personal Perspective
Owino Simon Odera, Ph.D. Department of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia

1:45 – 2:15
Molecular Surveillance for Tracking Drug Resistance and Novel Diagnostic Tools
Venkatachalam Udhayakumar, Ph.D. National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases / Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria/Malaria Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

2:15 – 2:45
Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center: The Importance of Systems Biology in the Fight Against Malaria
Mary Galinski, Ph.D. Infectious Diseases and Global Health, Emory University; Program Director, Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center (MaHPIC)

2:45 – 3:00
Break

3:00 – 3:30
Mathematical Models of Malaria: From Genes to Environment
Juan B. Gutierrez, Ph.D. Department of Mathematics, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, University of Georgia

3:30 – 4:00
Is the Landscape Shifting? Closing Remarks from a Veteran in the War Against Malaria
S. Patrick Kachur, MD, MPH, FACPM Chief of the Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Malaria Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

4:00 – 5:00
An Extraordinary Effort to Catch a Killer in the Dark
Presented by Imagine No Malaria, this documentary follows the stories of national and global efforts to combat malaria.

Sponsored by the following University of Georgia units: Biomedical and Health Sciences Institute, Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Cellular Biology, Department of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Bioinformatics, and the Office of the Vice President for Research.

Donald E. Champagne, Ph.D.

Donald Champagne, associate professor of entomology at the University of Georgia, completed his Ph.D. in biology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, followed by postdoctoral work at the University of Arizona in Tucson.  Champagne came to the department of entomology at University of Georgia in 1996 as an assistant professor, and subsequently was invited to join the Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases. His current research is focused on interactions between arthropod vectors (mainly mosquitoes, but also black flies, triatomine bugs, and ticks) and their vertebrate hosts. In particular, Champagne studies components of vector saliva that modulate defensive responses in the vertebrate host, including hemostatic and immune responses. More information.

Mary R. Galinski, Ph.D.

Mary Galinski has over 25 years of experience studying malaria parasites from different experimental vantage points, with the most recent 15 years as a Professor of Medicine, Infectious Diseases and Global Health at Emory University. Prior to joining Emory, she conducted malaria research as a student and member of the faculty at New York University Medical Center in the Department of Medical and Molecular Parasitology. Galinski built the malaria research team at Emory University, with affiliations that include the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory Vaccine Center and the Emory Institute for Drug Discovery. She has a longstanding interest in the bigger picture from a scientific and advocacy perspective, which also led her in 1992 to found the Malaria Foundation International. In 2006, Galinski co-founded the International Center of Malaria Research Education and Development (ICMRED) at Emory, and now the MaHPIC (Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center). Together, these efforts support her main interests – to study malaria in-depth, help devise solutions, and inform and educate the public. Her interests span from basic malaria research and epidemiology, to the development of vaccines and drugs to prevent or treat malaria. Relevant to the MaHPIC, she is especially interested in how Plasmodium parasites invade, remodel and thrive within host cells, and cause disease. More information.

Juan B. Gutierrez, Ph.D.

Juan Gutierrez is assistant professor of mathematics at the University of Georgia. His research lab specializes in mathematical models of ecological systems across multiple scales ranging from cellular interactions in immune systems, through continental scales in the study of species dispersal. The tools used in these diverse studies are the same: dynamical systems of finite dimensions (ordinary differential equations, discrete difference equations, agent-based models) or infinite dimensions (partial differential equations, delay equations). Gutierrez is currently funded by NIH NIAID’s International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research (ICEMR, global-scale epidemiology) and the Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center (MaHPIC, within-host dynamics). In these two large projects, his lab produces data management tools, analytical methods, and computational models for the study of malaria.

S. Patrick Kachur, MD, MPH, FACPM

S. Patrick Kachur is a medical epidemiologist and chief of CDC’s Malaria Branch. He trained at Kent State University, Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine, the Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, and Johns Hopkins University. Since 1995, he has conducted field research and provided technical assistance to malaria control programs in Africa and around the world. He has coauthored more than 50 peer-reviewed publications and has received multiple awards from the US Public Health Service, where he is a commissioned officer. More information.

Jessica C. Kissinger, Ph.D.

Jessica Kissinger, professor, department of genetics, earned her Ph.D. in molecular and cellular biology from Indiana University in 1995. She worked on the evolution and origin of human malaria as an NSF/Sloan postdoctoral researcher at NIH from 1995-1996, and as a CNPq Fellow at the Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou – FIOCRUZ in Brazil from 1996-1998. From 1998-2002, she switched to a related parasite,Toxoplasma gondii and worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Pennsylvania with David S. Roos. She moved to the University of Georgia in 2002, and in 2004, she received a Young Investigator award from the International Congress on Toxoplasmosis for her work on horizontal gene transfer in the apicomplexan nuclear genome. In 2009, she received the Creative Research Medal from the University of Georgia. Kissinger also is director of the Institute of Bioinformatics at the University of Georgia. Her research focuses on evolutionary genomics of parasites, systems biology of malaria and data integration. More information.

Julie M. Moore, Ph.D.

Julie Moore, professor of infectious diseases, has been interested in malaria since she participated in a semester abroad program in Kenya as an undergraduate. Her research over the past 18 years has focused on two aspects of the interaction between the malaria parasite and the pregnant mammalian host: how the host’s immune response protects both mother and fetus against malaria infection, and how the host’s immune response, if overactive, damages the placenta and fetus. Moore has worked in Kenya studying these problems in directly affected populations both as a post-doctoral fellow at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and as a member of the faculty of UGA’s department of infectious diseases and the Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases. In addition to field studies, her research program also incorporates studies in a mouse model her group has developed as well as studies of placental cell responses to malaria.

Vasant Muralidharan, Ph.D.

Vasant Muralidharan, assistant professor of cellular biology, has extensive training in protein chemistry, structural biology, parasite culturing, parasite biochemistry and genetics. Muralidharan has been trained in biological research at several world-class institutions including University of Mumbai, The Rockefeller University and Washington University, St. Louis. His lab at the University of Georgia focuses on understanding the roles of chaperones in the biology of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Muralidharan and his team are developing chemical biology-based tools to study gene function in the parasite. More information.

Simon O. Owino, Ph.D.

Simon Owino earned his bachelor’s of science in chemistry and zoology as well as his master’s degree in cell and molecular biology at Maseno University, Kenya. Owino received his doctorate in infectious diseases at the University of Georgia. He has studied human placental malaria extensively, focusing on interactions between the parasite Plasmodium falciparum and host syncytiotrophoblast development. While in Africa, Owino established strong community ties critical to his work with malaria. The goal of his current research at Pathens, Inc. is to develop an efficacious Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) vaccine. Owino is engineering a multivalent TB vaccine and evaluating it in an animal model.

David S. Peterson, Ph.D.

David Peterson received his bachelor’s of science in biochemistry from University of California, Davis and his doctorate from University of California, Irvine. Peterson is associate professor in the department of infectious diseases and a member of the Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases, one of the largest parasitology research groups in the country. He has over 25 years of experience in malaria research dating from his postdoctoral work at NIH, where he first worked on parasite resistance to antimalarial drugs, and later on the var gene family, encoding the major variant antigen of malaria. His primary research interests are in host/malarial parasite interactions as mediated by members of the var gene family, with his current focus being on the role of one particular family member, var2csa, in placental malaria. Currently his laboratory is characterizing var2csa both at the functional level via protein studies and by examining the genetic complexity of placental infections via both standard-cloning techniques and via deep sequencing strategies to better understand how host immune pressure selects for diversity in parasite antigens. More information.

Venkatachalam Udhayakumar “Kumar”, Ph.D.

Venkatachalam Udhayakumar received his bachelor’s of science in zoology, botany and chemistry from University of Madras, India. He also received his master’s and doctorate in immunology at Madurai-Kamaraj University, India. He is currently chief of the Genetics and Immunology Laboratory, Malaria Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Udhayakumar leads a team of scientists engaged in conducting infectious disease and public health research and program activities focusing on malaria. This includes molecular studies to understand the origins and spread of drug resistant parasites, genetic diversity of malaria parasites, development of novel field usable diagnostic tools, molecular barcoding of malaria parasites, host genetic factors and susceptibility to malaria, biology of transmission reduction, immunological aspects of malaria and pathogenesis of malaria. The research studies are conducted in collaboration with partners from several African, Asian and South American countries. He and his team actively support laboratory training to scientists and staff from collaborating partners in various countries while providing support for malaria program activities both nationally and internationally.

2013 Symposium

Rabies: An old disease with new tricks

Thursday, November 14, 2013 | 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Paul D. Coverdell Center for Biomedical and Health Sciences, Room 175
University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Join us at the University of Georgia for a symposium addressing rabies — a viral disease that affects the central nervous system of those infected. Rabies a persistent threat globally and is a relevant topic of study in regards to its immunity, infection, and ultimately its prevention.


Click the talk title for video of each presentation:

Few Poisons More Deadly than a Mad Dog’s Tooth: Rabies in the US and Abroad – Jesse Blanton, MPH. Poxvirus and Rabies Branch, NCEZID, CDC

Rabies Prevention: Some New Tricks from an Old Dog – Cherie Drenzek, DVM. State Epidemiologist, Georgia Department of Public Health

Rabies Virus Infection and Innate Immunity: Mechanisms of Immune Evasion – Zhen Fu, DVM, PhD. Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia

Drivers of Rabies Exposure and Persistence in Vampire Bat Colonies in Latin America – Sonia Altizer, PhD. Associate Professor, Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia

Coons, Cows and Cats, Oh My! Rabies in Georgia – Julie Gabel, DVM. State Public Health Veterinarian, GA Department of Public Health

Building a Rabies Surveillance System: A One Health Approach – Melissa Ivey. Epidemiologist, Ga Department of Public Health

The Masked Bandit: A Transplant Tragedy – Neil Vora, MD. Poxvirus and Rabies Branch, NCEZID, CDC

9:00am Registration begins

10:00am Few Poisons More Deadly than a Mad Dog’s Tooth:
  Rabies in the US and Abroad, Jesse Blanton, CDC

10:40am Rabies Prevention: Some New Tricks from an Old Dog, Cherie Drenzek, Georgia Department of Public Health

11:20am Rabies Virus Infection and Innate Immunity: Mechanisms of Immune Evasion, Zhen Fu, UGA

12:00pm Lunch

1:00pm Drivers of Rabies Exposure and Persistence in Vampire Bat Colonies in Latin America, Sonia Altizer, UGA

1:40pm Coons, Cows, and Cats, Oh My! Rabies in Georgia, Julie Gabel, Georgia Department of Public Health                                                                                                                  ,

2:00pm Building a Rabies Surveillance System: A One Health Approach, Melissa Ivey, Georgia Department of Public Health

2:40pm The Masked Bandit: A Transplant Tragedy, Neil Vora, CDC

2013 International Symposium

2013 International Symposium

The University of Georgia and the University of Liverpool co-sponsored the first One Health International Symposium, Breaking Barriers and Crossing Scales,  in Athens, GA, March 2013.

Symposium Themes:  

Microbiome, hos-pathogen-host interactions, and biodiversity and infection.

Keynote speaker:

Mathews H. Bonds, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School
“Ecology of Poverty and Disease.”

2013 Symposium Video